wisteria garden

ADD HEIGHT & DIMENSION TO YOUR GARDEN

In the last couple of years, my husband and I have slowly added a number of vertical accents into our garden. Some are functional, others are simply eye candy, but all add that much-needed element of height and dimension in the garden — because when everything is planted on the same plane, things get boring pretty quickly.

So, if you want to add some vertical elements into your garden, check out this article on the “why’s”, but if you’re ready for the “how,” keep reading.

Trellis: A trellis is a flat structure made of interwoven wood or metal pieces, for the purpose of growing climbers like ivy, climbing roses, grapevines or clematis. I like using trellises at the back of the garden, against a fence or wall, because it gives a lovely green backdrop to every plant in front of it. You can purchase ready-made trellises at garden centers or home improvement stores, or make your own using open-work ranch panels. Feeling creative? Re-purpose items like old bed springs — use t-posts or rebar to stake them into the ground, then let your vines grow up and do their thing!

red roses

Arbor: Typically a wooden or metal bench with a roof and enclosed with lattice panels, an arbor is often confused with a pergola (below). Arbors are charming additions to any garden, beckoning a gardener to sit and rest for a while in between planting and pruning. Be careful to add vines that will not take over the arbor to a degree that you can’t sit on the bench, however — then you’ll have simply created an interesting but nonfunctional piece of garden art.

Pergola: A pergola is a structure that includes vertical posts with overhead crossbeams upon which plants grow. It can be long, forming a walkway, or short, creating a leafy entrance from one garden space to another. While it can have seating underneath it, it typically doesn’t have seating attached to it like an arbor does. In my front yard, I have a combination arbor/pergola — it’s a metal structure that has attached seating on both sides, but also features an overhead piece. We’ve trained a Confederate jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides), so when it blooms in the spring, you’re surrounded by a perfumed explosion of white flowers.

Espellier: Espellier is a way of growing plants (particularly trees, shrubs, and woody vines) on a flat surface like a wall, a fence or a trellis. Traditionally, fruit trees have been grown this way for ages. The idea is to prune the plant to develop one main stem or trunk, then carefully over time, prune the side branches to grow laterally. It’s not only beautiful but allows the gardener to grow numerous plants on a smaller footprint — and if you can get some apples as a result? Major score.

About the Author:

Jenny Peterson

Jenny Peterson is a landscape designer and urban farmer living in Austin, Texas. She comes from a family of gardeners and her gardens include drought-tolerant plants, herbs, veggies, and a wildflower pollinator garden. As a breast cancer survivor, Jenny specializes in gardens that heal from the inside out.

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