What are the best veggies to preserve?

TOP 5 VEGGIES FOR PRESERVING

Are you new to preserving your organic harvest, or are you interested and don’t quite know where to begin? Well, one place to begin is to know which veggies preserve well in the first place. Now, there are several different methods of preserving, so our top 5 veggies for preserving are those that are easy to grow and are able to be preserved by both canning and freezing. Is your favorite veggie on this list?

Carrots: This orange veggie is easy to grow, and although most varieties demand loose and deep soil, some varieties will grow in shallower soils. In cooler climates, sow seeds 3 weeks before your last expected frost, and in warmer climates (Zone 8 and warmer), plan for a fall or winter planting.

SEE ALSO: Why and how to Preserve your Organic Garden Harvest

Onions: I read somewhere recently that “if you can poke a hole in the ground, you can grow an onion.” Well, that seems pretty easy to me! Onions like cool weather in their early growth stages, so in cool climates that means spring, and in mild climates, that means fall or even winter. Use transplants, sets, or seeds.

Asparagus: Asparagus gets a bit of a bad rap for being difficult to grow, but it’s not really that hard if you simply give it what it wants. Do you live in an area that has cool/cold winters and milder summers? If so, your garden is a good candidate for growing asparagus. Prepare the beds well and choose your garden location wisely, because asparagus is a perennial veggie that returns each year for up to 20 years! See, isn’t that work worth it?

Peas: From snap peas to snow and shell peas, this tiny green veggie is useful for so many types of dishes. Many pea varieties are vines while others are compact bushes, but all appreciate some type of support from a trellis, a stake, or a cage. Plant one month before your last expected frost and again in late summer if you live in an area with mild winters.

Corn: Corn needs a good deal of space to grow adequately, consistent moisture, and nitrogen-rich soil. Corn also needs complete pollination in order to produce, and one way to encourage that is to plant in blocks rather than rows. Be prepared to hand pollinate if necessary, and be sure to check with your local experts for recommendations on when to plant, as corn is very frost-sensitive.

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